Month: January 2011

Tales of the unexpected

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Sometimes nature is just so unpredictable and amazing that it takes your breath away.

Today’s tale comes from a recent episode of the ‘Radio Workshop’, a radio series about science, made in New York, and often replayed on our own Science Show.

The episode in question was about the ‘oops’ factor – mistakes humans have made in an honest pursuit of some advance or outcome. As I’ve said before, this is a key characteristic of the method of science – we don’t bury mistakes, we learn from them. Anyway, to the story. Initially this story is about the mess left behind by mining operations (that’s the ‘oops’ bit), but the story takes a fascinating twist, decades after the mine closed. Please try and stay with it – it’s worth the wait!

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God and earthquakes

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What’s the connection between earthquakes and god? I bet your answer is nowhere near what I have in mind.

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Climate Change – the simple facts

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As I mentioned in an earlier post, climate change is one of those topics on which it’s hard for the layman to make a judgement. Whom do you believe? Do you trust the pollies to know all about it and therefore feel comfortable following their lead?

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About Research Transparency

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Further to my recent spray about the TGA accepting gifts, and Elmore Oil’s dubious research offerings, there has been a lot of chatter recently regarding conflicts of interest in research settings – and specifically, research sponsored by drug companies.

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